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Messages - Sandy Sanderson

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1
General Discussion / Re: The Water Myth
« on: July 30, 2014, 06:56:04 PM »
Just been looking at replacing my Hydration system for my trip to lakes in September.

Lyle posted:

Quote
which is why only filtering stream water is risky as these portable filters do not remove viruses - they filter to 0.1 microns and to filter viruses out you need to go to 0.02 microns

And i found:

http://www.geigerrig.com/hydration-packs/accessories-Inline-virus-filter.html

The company states that it will remove removes:
 
≥99.9% Protozoans (Cryptosporidium and Giardia)
≥99.9999% Bacteria (Raoutella terrigena)
≥99.99% Virus (MS-2 Bacteriophage)

Not to sure about the top one, but i know the other 2 can be bad. The only thing that I cannot see on the website is filter size itself.

They also state:

This patent pending design and manufacturing method has been thoroughly tested and certified by independent laboratories to consistently remove protozoan cysts, bacteria, and virus to ANSI/NSF Standard 52, and US EPA standards without the use of disinfecting chemicals such as chlorine, bromine, or iodine.

I have tried to find the standards on the net but i just kept going round in circles on the EPA website.

I have also emailed the company requesting information on their inline filter, hopefully i will get a reply in the next few days.

Hoping this may kill 2 birds with one stone for me, a water purfication/filter system and hydration bag (Almost all in one).

2
Lyle, this really grabs my attention, due to my job and the work I conduct with fixed GPS units onboard.

Just had a look at the website, and I could not see the method they are using to stop the anti-jamming/spoofing.

After a bit of googling I found a presentation about the GINCAN. 

https://connect.innovateuk.org/documents/3347783/3709538/gnss_anti_jam_tech_jones.pdf/56097f6d-1055-4897-9236-a3dc7490d60d

Its seems they will be employing a Controlled Radiation Pattern Antenna (CRPA) set up. Which nulls sectors on the antenna nullifying the jamming signal to allow the relative weak (compared to the jamming signal) GPS signal through.

Which while effective in preventing anti-jamming it also decreases the accuracy of the GNSS unit due to the loss of sectors and therefore satellites.

The link below to a NOVATEL White paper from 2012 explains it in a lot more detail.

http://www.novatel.com/assets/gajt/pdf/gajt-white-paper.pdf

Dependant on the price, this will either take off brilliantly with the consumer or it will fail.  I cannot personally think of reason why I would need anti-jamming capabilities when out walking, biking etc.

3
Emergency & Backup Equipment / Re: Grab Bag Contents
« on: July 26, 2014, 10:48:22 PM »
Paul,

Just a couple of points to consider while floating around in the big blue sea, this is what I have picked up from been in the navy (which are still current practices).

If you can change one of the air band transceivers to a 9GHz X-band Radar transceiver , this will allow navigational radar from other ships (and possible some helicopters) to pick you up in the water and has an approximate range of about 12 nautical miles. However they are not cheap about £500.

Do not drink any water for the first 24hr as you have very limited water with you and anything you put into your body in the first day will be wasted as urine. The theory behind this is that your body is full of water when you have made your escape into the life raft.

Change the chocy bar to boiled sweets, they require less water to digest and absorb into the body or so the navy lead me to believe.

Also some sea sickness tablets to your pack and ensure that everybody takes them as soon as you have them in your life raft. Once again itís about preserving what fluid you have in your body; donít want people bringing it up.

With regards to the Immersion Suits (Survival Suits), the average temperature of the English Channel is about 6-8 degrees on a night time and 15-18 degrees in the day during the summer months.  The average survival time is in the 6-8 degrees is approximately 2 hours with unconsciousness after 45 minutes.  At 15-18 degrees this is approximately 2 - 40 hours. Survival Suits greatly increase these times, to 4.5 in 6-8 degrees of water before unconsciousness.

Hope this has helped

Sandy

4
General Discussion / Re: The Water Myth
« on: July 25, 2014, 11:10:16 AM »
I can remember reading about a water bottle that would produce clean drinkable water from fresh air.

At first i though that it was a joke article but after doing a little more research I found a small company in the U.S. called NBD NANO. They are currently in the process of biomimicking the Namib Desert Beatle which by produces it own water due to condensation in its outer shell.

Now if they actually manage to get this fully up and running then the applications of this, not just in the hiking community, would be extremely beneficial in warmer climates.

Here is a link to the company.

http://www.nbdnano.com/index.php

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-20465982

Will be good to see the water creation rate (if thatís the correct phrase) of one these bottles and the price.  As I would be very interested in purchasing one especially when working in the Middle East where drinkable water in more expensive than fuel.

5
Yes I believe I have, I loaded my GPS with a route, ensured that it loaded correctly and then turned it off and removed the batteries.

I then waited 10 minutes re-inserted the batteries and turned the unit back on. Route still there so donít have a faulty unit.

Just need to remember now to believe everything I read in some reviews.

Cheers everyone.

6
General Discussion / Re: Roll/Sleeping Mat Advice.
« on: July 21, 2014, 05:04:05 PM »
Well I have taken the plunge,

I have read some reviews about the Exped SynMat Ultralite 9 I really canít believe the thickness they are and the size they pack down to.

There is now way I would be able to get a foam mat down to the size of these packed.  90mm thickness for something that packs to 230mm by 130mm at 589g is amazing.

My only worry now will be getting up in the morning and not sleeping in if they are really that comfy.

Cheers for the advice.

Sandy

7
General Discussion / Roll/Sleeping Mat Advice.
« on: July 20, 2014, 05:09:30 PM »
Hello,

Iím looking at replacing my none existent sleeping mat and was wondering what style to go for.

My last one was a 4 Season ex-military foam mat (that they still use today or the navy just hasnít kept up with the rest of the Armed Forces) which I cut down to just cover to below my back.  I also used it as a liner for my rucksack as it made a nice round tube to pack every thing into.

Iím looking for something light weight but at the same time stops the ground temp from coming up. 

I have looked at the Vango and Therm-a-rest self-inflating ones but they still look a little bulky and too long, as im happy for it only to cover from my head to the top half of my legs.

The one that Iím looking at purchasing is Ajungilak Alpine Mat.  I have never heard of this company, but i saw it on Amazon for £35 where as the rest where about £6 telling me either the others are not worth having or the seller is trying to pull a fast one.

Any advice or suggested products would be greatly appreciated.

8
Satnav (GPS GLONASS COMPASS Galileo) / Garmin GPSMAP 64 loses data?
« on: July 17, 2014, 06:22:29 PM »
I have just gone and bought myself the Garmin 64ST, and I was reading a review afterwards (stupidly) and it stated that when you change the batteries that you loose all track, waypoints and routes data.

Has anyone used a 64 and come across this problem?

I assume that it would be more beneficial to carry around a battery charging kit (similar to Powermonkey approved by Garmin) instead of a spare set of AA batteries so that i can charge the set that is in the unit and potentially not loose data.


9
New Member Introductions / Hello
« on: July 16, 2014, 09:23:12 AM »
I'm Phil, been walking for about the past 20 years in the hills, but it has declined in the past 5 due to family commitments. Just become a Explorer Scout Leader and im looking at becoming the lead DofE leader for the group.

After reading some of the posts, so much has seemed to have changed with regards to the kit people are now using.

I am now looking forward to getting back out there and relearning all the skills to past them on to the younger generation.

So hello and thank you for letting me join.

P.S if anyone can suggest some good books that i can download and read on my kindle while im away at sea with work it would be much appreciated.




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