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Azimuth or Bearing

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Skills4Survival:
No, do not go often to Germany, outside shopping trips but do go to Belgian Ardennes quite a lot. The 360 is coming from geometry/math history (see http://mathforum.org/library/drmath/view/59075.html) . Am planning a trip though, bought some maps as well but Belgium for me is easier, 2 hours drive away, or less, and you are in a nice forest with often "bad" conditions, which I like. Area is called "Hoge Venen", here an impression http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bestand:Hautes-Fagnes.jpg.


--- Quote from: Pete McK on January 07, 2012, 10:26:28 AM ---Your welcome Ivo :)

Living in Holland I guess you may have travelled to Germany quite a few times and wondered if you have come across any of the 400 degree compasses the UNM refers to? They seem to make more sense than the conventional 360.

Plus, does anyone know why we use 360?

--- End quote ---

Hugh Westacott:

--- Quote from: Pete McK on January 07, 2012, 10:26:28 AM ---Your welcome Ivo :)

Living in Holland I guess you may have travelled to Germany quite a few times and wondered if you have come across any of the 400 degree compasses the UNM refers to? They seem to make more sense than the conventional 360.

Plus, does anyone know why we use 360?

--- End quote ---

It derives from the Babylonian sexagesimal system from where we also get 60 seconds in a minute and 60 minutes in an hour as well as 360 degrees in a circle.

It's extraordinary that it should have lasted for thousands of years. I'm no mathematician but I understand that the sexagesimal sistem has much to commend it. I believe that Napolean tried to metricate the measurement of time but it failed to catch on.

Hugh

MalcolmHandoll:

--- Quote from: Hugh Westacott on January 08, 2012, 01:04:29 PM ---
It derives from the Babylonian sexagesimal system from where we also get 60 seconds in a minute and 60 minutes in an hour as well as 360 degrees in a circle.

It's extraordinary that it should have lasted for thousands of years. I'm no mathematician but I understand that the sexagesimal sistem has much to commend it. I believe that Napolean tried to metricate the measurement of time but it failed to catch on.

Hugh

--- End quote ---

The Ring of Brodgar, here in Orkney, dates from the 3rd Millennium BC also, and is unusually circular for a Stone Age circle. It had stones erected around the circle every 6 degrees so is thought to have originally had 60 stones. it is 104 m in diameter with a huge ditch surrounding the stones. I mention it because it suggests a maritime connection between Babylonians and the North of Scotland, maybe a cultural link? Quite likely great navigators.

Barry G:
Ivo, I know I'm a day late and a dollar short with this reply but remember I just joined this forum recently and I'm trying to catch up. When I was a young Marine (in the mid '50's) the compass training was exclusively Lensatic compasses and the word AZIMUTH was the only word used to express "direction/bearings". We would say " shoot a azimuth" or "follow a azimuth". After leaving the military the civilian world in the USA used only the word "bearing". In the military we used degrees (red scale) and mils (black scale) degrees being 360 and mils being 6,400. If formal use of the word "Bearing" was used in the military it referred to the quadrent system. Today the commonly used term in the USA is "bearing" and that means 360 degrees.

Barry

Skills4Survival:
Thanks Barry, that is helpful. I had that impression as well and in general you see that certain wording is now used differently in different professions, but...as you also show, it is all the same.

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