Author Topic: Scotlands first sex change mountain  (Read 1757 times)

Jester

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 66
  • The Airdrie Rambler
    • View Profile
    • Airdrie rambler
Scotlands first sex change mountain
« on: January 07, 2013, 08:15:18 AM »
Beinn Heasgarnich is apparently now Beinn Sheasgarnich 
Got a new edition of Memory Map and noticed this, which to me is a pretty significant change. This hill is Scotlands 63rd highest, as listed in Munros tables, yet overnight the name has been changed and no one seems aware of this. A google search for Beinn Sheasgarnich last night produced ZERO results. I'm not aware of any great clamour to have the hill renamed, so why do so?
When you consider the hoo-ha that surrounds the reclassification of some hills to/from Munro status you might think that OS may have tipped off the MCofS or some other similar body.
Could the changing of popular hill names have an effect on mountain rescue for example?
Those are my principles, and if you don't like them... well, I have others.
Groucho Marx

Callum

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 512
    • View Profile
Re: Scotlands first sex change mountain
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2013, 03:53:54 PM »
I was not aware of this Jester, on first glance it seems crazy. Is there a website which details all of these changes and are they limited to Scotland do you know?

Jester

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 66
  • The Airdrie Rambler
    • View Profile
    • Airdrie rambler
Re: Scotlands first sex change mountain
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2013, 11:17:58 PM »
I contacted the Ordnance Survey who told me that:
We are going to keep this Munro name as Beinn Sheasgarnich as this is the Gaelic form of the name.

The name was changed as part of the revision of Explorer 378 between 2002 and 2007.Our records say that the information came from ‘Watson 2002, 179’.  Watson 2002: Watson, W. J., 2002, Scottish Place-Name Papers (London and Edinburgh), “A collection of articles and essays on Scottish place-names” by W. J. Watson (1865-1948).

The name was changed in the large scale data in 2005.

Ordnance Survey does not inform third parties of any changes to our mapping. However we have found that some websites now list both names, for example, http://www.hill-bagging.co.uk/Scotland/mountaindetails.php?qu=M&rf=145

Ordnance Survey works with the Ainmean-Ŕite na h-Alba (AŔA) to ensure consistency of Gaelic names depiction but we are not an authority on Gaelic names and our Gaelic names policy can be found here

http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite/about-us/our-policies/gaelic-names.html

http://airdrierambler.wordpress.com/2013/06/10/he-is-now-a-she/
« Last Edit: July 06, 2013, 11:23:07 PM by Jester »
Those are my principles, and if you don't like them... well, I have others.
Groucho Marx