Trip Reports > Plans

St Andrews

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Lyle Brotherton:
Spending the week up here (08042013) and fully intend to revisit Balaka Indian restaurant which I visited last with some RAF SAR crew, they grow all their own spices.

Barry G:
Lyle, be careful eating some of those spices because some of them can only be eaten by those who have eaten them from childhood. They could lite a fire in you that you can put out or some other unexpected bodily surprises!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Barry

Lyle Brotherton:
Hi Barry,  good to hear from you  :)

Unusually I did have spicy food as a youngster, when most other British kids were having Windsor soup followed by meat and two veg. British food has changed phenomenally, for the better, since I was young. My Grandfather had served with the British Army in India and Afghanistan and brought home with him a taste for exotic food. I remember going with him to Bradford in Yorkshire,  where there is a large Asian community,  to buy spices. The best part was that my Grandmother would cook the curries but never ate any herself. She was a wee church of Scotland Scott and anything exotic was frowned upon.

Going thru my Grandfather's service record, his campaign medals and diaries, is an interesting exercise in history repeating itself and us not learning lessons from the past, the two most noticeable postings, other than his active service in the Somme,  were the North West Frontier in Afghanistan and as Provost in Palestine.

Barry G:
Lyle, God love and hold dear those who served and their families, your Grandfather among them. I'm married to a first generation Italian and I had to quickly acquire a tolerance for spices!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Barry

Lyle Brotherton:
Lucky man Barry. Italian is the food I eat most of  :)

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