Author Topic: Tips  (Read 3150 times)

Stu

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 21
    • View Profile
Tips
« on: November 10, 2011, 02:01:26 PM »
Hi
Seen a few posts on tips used by members of the forum, so thought it may be a good idea to collect these into one thread.
If one of the mods could take the time to copy tips from other threads, then this could become a sticky!!
A few to get started

1      When pacing, dont walk behind or next to somebody, has you tend to get into the same stride [any ex forces will know what Im talking about]

2      Find your walking speed by pacing 100m and timing how long it takes ie 1:30 s then speed is 4 k. you can do this over different ground/conditions during a walk, and multiply up for the time taken to complete a leg

3       Wearing a wide brim hat or hat with a peak can shelter your map/compass when taking taking bearings etc
I'm always disorientated...its just the degree that varies!

Lyle Brotherton

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 939
  • Competent and safe navigation sets you free.
    • View Profile
Re: Tips
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2011, 05:08:31 PM »
Top idea Stu :)

...and whatever a sticky is (genuinely) sounds a great idea too.

Strange you mention peaked hat, was with a team this week who have provided all members with peaked hats for this very reason, plus when you are looking into the distance your eyes do not have to compensate for stray light.
“Opinion is the medium between knowledge and ignorance” - Plato

Egg

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 105
    • View Profile
Re: Tips
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2011, 06:23:57 PM »
As mentioned in posts re: night time navigation, peaked cap also keeps torch light away from the eyes are does a bit to preserve night vision.
Everyday's a school day...

Paul Hitchen

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 32
    • View Profile
    • Jonty's Cottage
Re: Tips
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2012, 02:58:16 PM »
Hi
I assess Duke of Edinburgh Award Expeditions and conduct training (great fun working with kids).

I’m trying to come up with an easy, memorable method for micro navigating at Gold level (approx 18 years old) in wild country.

The ‘syllabus’ for the one day Gold DOE advanced navigation session (used by one authority)  is –
Orientating the map to features and the compass.
Identifying and recognising features and terrain on the ground to the map and vice versa.
Taking Grid and Ground feature bearings.
Distance and time measurements including pacing and Naismith.
Aiming off and following hand rails.
Leapfrogging and following bearings.
A basic lost procedure. Basic emergency procedures.

I am trying a simple pneumonic for each mini leg.   DD TT

Direction (compass bearing),  Distance (of mini leg),  Terrain (what to expect on route, catching features, and what's at the end of the leg) and Time for leg ( time per 100 m plus 1 min per 10m contour climbed).

The idea is to split each leg into mini legs in bad weather/difficult conditions or terrain, and do a DDTT for each mini leg.  (The hardest part seems to be getting them not to switch off and forget time. )

I think this is about the right level, much more detail may not be easy to absorb. These kids have a lot on with A levels and million other extra curricula activities.

Any suggestions, comments, improvements most welcome.   Views?

Pete McK

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 374
    • View Profile
Re: Tips
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2012, 05:06:37 PM »
 
Check out the great postings about mnemonics on this forum

MicroNavigation Forum » Techniques » Variations of Existing Techniques » Mnemonics
 

Pete McK

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 374
    • View Profile
Re: Tips
« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2012, 05:15:40 PM »
And some are useless, I saw this on a US Military navigation site:

'Setting or orientating the map means turning the map until all the symbols on the map arein the same direction as the ground features is from the observer's location. A handymnemonic that you can use to remember how to do this is: DD CRAPPS!
D The direction of features must always coincide
D The distance to a feature will help to identify it on the map
C Conventional symbols on the map to the features on the ground
R Relief may be the only recognisable feature in wild country
A The linear features will assist in confirming direction and identification
P A pattern is recognisable
P The proximity of features to each other will help to identify it on the map
S The shape of a feature will help to identify it on the map

captain paranoia

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 384
    • View Profile
Re: Tips
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2012, 07:06:34 PM »
Mnemonics don't work for me; I can never remember what the mnemonic is supposed to remind me.  I prefer to try to get the fundamental concept understood clearly, and hopefully remembered.  I know different people remember things in different ways.

Having said that, I've created a set of aide memoire notes (for me), consisting of lists of one of two word concepts, for use when I'm supervising DoE, to remind me what I need to do.  It prints at 16 mini-pages on an A4, and fits nicely into any pocket.  And then goes through the washing machine...